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Dragon’s Teeth on Maui

Dragon's Teeth Maui 1

Dragon's Teeth Maui 2

Dragon's Teeth Maui 3

Dragon's Teeth Maui 4

Dragon's Teeth Maui 4

Dragon's Teeth Sunset

All photos above were taken by Darren McDaniel of  The Maui Darren.  “Sometimes hard to capture the beautiful color of the Dragon’s Teeth area in Kapalua; the soft grey’s often rendering the images muted . My advice: go early in the day, or late for sunset… or bring a good neutral density filter and tripod.”

Dragon’s Teeth is a good example of what can happen when forces of nature collide. As the lava from the West Mau’i Volcano poured into the ocean, fierce wind and waves forced it back and it cooled into a formation that resembles great black teeth. Makalua-puna Point was created from one of the last lava flows on Maui. However, the lava is a little different from the rest of the lava on Maui – it is much lighter, denser, and fine-grained. The wind sweeping over the point caused the lava to harden in an upward fashion. The jagged points of this formation look like dragon’s teeth, thus the name. Honu (sea turtles) often swim close to shore, so peer over the edge and look for them. To get to Dragon’s Teeth take Honoapi’ilani Hwy northeast and turn left onto Office Road just past mile marker 30 – continue reading this at Guide of Hawaii

For more information and direction on Dragon’s Teeth in Kapalua, Maui – go to this page at  www.govisithawaii.com

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Hawaiian Monk Seal – Let’s Help Save In Ways We Can

MONK SEAL BY ALEXANDR LAUDET

Photo Credit: Alexandre Lauder

The Hawaiian monk seal is a species in crisis. There are currently fewer than 1,100 seals remaining and their numbers continue to decline by 4% per year. The challenges they face are numerous including shark predation, human disturbance and habituation, fishery interactions, habitat loss, entanglement in marine debris, infectious disease, and even intentional killings. If the current population trends aren’t reversed, the population is expected to slip below 1,000 within the next few years.

Hawaiian Monk Seal chillin at Maui Sunset

Photo Credit: Bazza Duck

Key Facts about the Hawaiian Monk Seal:

  • The Hawaiian Monk Seal is one of the most endangered species in the world
  • They are endemic to the Hawaiian Islands and exist nowhere else in the world
  • Habitat covers 1,240 miles from the Northwest Hawaiian Islands to the main Hawaiian Islands
  • The Hawaiian name is ‘Ilio-holo-i-ka-uaua, which translates to dog running in the rough seas
  • Monk Seals are the oldest species of seals on the planet
MONK SEAL BY DARREN

Photo Credit: Darren MacDaniel

The Maui Darren‘s Top Five things you can do to help:
1.) Let ’em be! Give ’em space (100′ or more), use a zoom.
2.) Call it in 808.292.2372 on Maui!
3.) Educate. Endangered!
4.) Be the Champion. Spread the Word!
5.) Volunteer, Donate!

Hawaiian Monk Seal Bazza Duck

Photo Credit: Bazza Duck

Facebook Pages of Organizations Helping Save the Hawaiian Monk Seals from extinction
Photo Credit: Mark Goldberg

Photo Credit: Mark Goldberg

MONK SEAL SIGHTING HOTLINES
Oahu: (808) 220-7802
Kauai: (808) 651-7668
Molokai: (808) 553-5555
Maui & Lanai: (808) 292-2372
East Hawaii: (808) 756-5961
West Hawaii: (808) 987-0765
Hawaiian Monk Seal & Sunset

Photo Credit: Bazza Duck

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